All I know is that I walked into the room with writer's block, and then I spent an hour not thinking about the story at all - I was trying to draw a flower, and it was hard.  After an hour, I went back to my desk, and the story just flowed.
- Selam Gebrekidan, Reuters-New York data team. The story she references was nominated for a Pulitzer in 2017.  Read it!
I believe our experiment at least anecdotally demonstrated how drawing does seem to clear the mind in a way that promotes dealing with complex challenges.

- Bob Felton, Professor, Reynolds School of Journalism, University of Nevada-Reno

 

Art at work

Learn to draw, cross train your brain!
*Art classes delivered two ways:
1) Live and online using your preferred teleconferencing software, or 
2) In Person (additional travel and lodging fees may apply)
*Flexible schedules, payment options
*Teaching fee includes a 90-minute class and a private "train the trainer" session designated by you
*Classes geared for all experience levels

There are many reasons to offer drawing in your workplace, but chief among them: it creates happy employees! 

FEES:
$300 per 90-minute class;
$600 per half day (4 hours);
$1,200 per full day (8 hours)

Before I became an artist, I was a journalist for a decade, working up from small dailies in the U.S. to helping cover the Hong Kong handover for Time Magazine's Asian edition.  The only bigger challenge for me was learning to draw, and I spent years practicing and learning.  

And I noticed something interesting: as my drawing improved, so did my writing.  I was able to visualize the lead - or essence of a story - with more speed and ease than before.  Brain research into alzheimers patients seemed to suggest a connection:  learning new and challenging material - like studying a language, which engages the entire brain - increases all mental functions.  I posit that learning to draw, which is a skill anyone can learn, meets that same criteria.

I have taught drawing in retreats, and in live, online class settings around the country.  Clients include:  Thomson-Reuters News Wire service; the Center for Investigative Reporting; NerdWallet;  the New Jersey Star-Ledger;  the Edwards Center; Masterplans; Sock it to Me; Multnomah County Adult Abuse Prevention; and the NWEA testing assessment non-profit organization.